Getting out of your lease

Sometime getting out of your lease early can be a preemptive strike when worried about getting evicted. Leaving your lease before your term has ended and before any eviction processes have started, this can stop trouble in its tracks.

Although, something to keep in mind, if your lease is almost up it may be more affordable to see it out rather than break it or cancel it. That is of course if you have the money to see it ‘til the end. But before any action is taken to get out of your lease, ensure that all you are aware of all consequences and procedures involved in this action. Often a lease will include a clause stating that notice must be given with enough time for new occupants to be found in good time. Sometimes the renter may even be obligated to find a new tenant if the lease is being broken – often the current rent payer will have to continue rent until the original lease is up, or until a new tenant has been found.

Getting out of your lease won’t release you from your obligation to pay your landlord any past-due rent before you move out. Unless you pay that debt, your landlord can by all means deduct it from your security deposit, along with any late fees and other expenses you may owe. If the deposit doesn’t cover it, you will take the brunt of the cost.