blesser

Blesser Finder #MoralsMustFall?

‘Don’t let the world judge your hustle, if you know you are beautiful, why must you struggle?’

This is the @Blesserfind Twitter handle description. If you haven’t heard the buzz around the Blesser Finder Facebook page, Twitter handle and App, you soon will. A new, free service that sets up ‘sugar daddies’ with women and men, who want to be spoiled in return for sex, has tongues wagging.

The reception to Blesser Finder has been unprecedented, with 10 000 Facebook members and counting, signing up to find their blesser or blessee match.

‘This is the reason why our website is crushing, 296000 visitors in one day. We are the future #MoralsMustFall’ @Blesserfind recently Tweeted.

What is Blesser Finder?

The identities of the Blesser Finder founders are unknown. What we do know is the company is made up of four people and headed by a 38-year old woman, who is a historian of all things.

On Blesser Finder’s Facebook page, which calls itself a dating site, you will find daily updates featuring droves of benefactors looking to ‘bless’ and a great many more looking to be ‘blessed’.

Blesser Finder uses the term ‘blessing’, not in the divine-gift-from-God sense, but rather to refer to the finer things in life, granted by those who can afford them to those who cannot, yet have a taste for them.

Naturally, these ‘blessees’ should be willing, open-minded and possess all the other qualities required of an individual who is game to exchange sex for trips, jewellery, fancy dinners and other luxury perks. Of course, Blesser Finder also arranges same-sex hook ups.

How the Blesser Trend Began

The Blesser trend was born on Facebook, after unemployed women started sharing statuses and images showing off their lavish lifestyles and calling themselves ‘blessed’. Intrigued by this display of affluence, social media users began to ask who their ‘blessers’ were.

Unsurprisingly, not all reactions to Blesser Finder have been positive, with some social media users condemning it as online prostitution. True to controversial form, Blesser Finder’s retort was to begin tagging their posts with #MoralsMustFall.

Blesser Finder’s Facebook page ‘about’ section reads: ‘A blesser is a new trend. Why suffer as if you are not beautiful enough to be blessed? Enjoy yourself, and don’t let people judge you.’

Love it or hate it, the sheer volume of likes and comments the page has accumulated in just a short period of time is overwhelming to say the least.

How It Works

How it works is blessers send a direct message to the page’s inbox, making an offer and describing the type of person they are looking for. Blessers are particular about the body type, features and age of the individual they are interested in.

They also specify how much they are willing to pay for, say a holiday or a month with them. Though, the blesser remains anonymous – neither their name or profile picture are displayed.

Posts are comprised of a screen grab of the blesser’s description of what they want and headed ‘Advert Alert’. Those who fit the description and are interested then ask to be hooked up with the blesser.

The majority of the blessers say they are frequent travellers in search of someone to accompany them on domestic and international flights. Once hooked up, they take them to swanky restaurants and buy them expensive clothing, jewellery, shoes – you name it. The presumption of course is that they will be rewarded with sexual favours.

The Burning Question

The advent of the Blesser Finder trend begs the question: are these woman and men resorting to a sordid social contract because they are tired of not being able to afford to treat themselves in a hostile economic climate?

With rampant inflation, fuel price increases, interest rate hikes, food price increases and electricity tariff hikes, low-income South Africans can barely afford the basics anymore – let alone luxuries.

Could it be that these individuals have become accustomed to opulence funded by credit cards, but cannot afford to support this lifestyle anymore? Hooked on high rolling and desperate for financial escapism, they become open to trading their bodies to live large again, if only for an instant.

One thing’s for certain, Blessers are only offering a transient taste of the high life. They are by no means a sustainable source of financial support to those with morals loose enough to jump aboard the trend.

If you are struggling, there is a better, more sustainable way to get the financial support you need. When the Blesser trend comes to an end, National Debt Advisors will be there to save the day!